How To Fix P0139 Code?

How To Fix P0139 Code?

Have you been getting the P0139 code on your car’s dashboard? This code indicates that your oxygen sensor heater circuit is malfunctioning. While this may seem like a serious problem, it’s actually a relatively easy fix. In this article, we’ll walk you through the steps on how to fix the P0139 code yourself.

We’ll start by explaining what the P0139 code means and why it’s important to fix it. Then, we’ll give you a step-by-step guide on how to troubleshoot the problem and replace the oxygen sensor heater if necessary. By the end of this article, you’ll be able to fix the P0139 code and get your car back on the road in no time.

What is the P0139 Code?

The P0139 code is a generic OBD-II code that indicates that the oxygen sensor heater circuit is malfunctioning. This code can be caused by a number of different problems, including:

  • A faulty oxygen sensor
  • A damaged wiring harness
  • A bad connection between the oxygen sensor and the PCM

Why is it Important to Fix the P0139 Code?

The P0139 code is important to fix because it can lead to a number of problems, including:

  • Reduced fuel economy
  • Increased emissions
  • Engine misfires
  • Damage to the catalytic converter

How to Fix the P0139 Code

To fix the P0139 code, you’ll need to troubleshoot the problem and replace the oxygen sensor heater if necessary. Here are the steps involved:

1. Check the oxygen sensor heater circuit. Use a multimeter to check the resistance of the oxygen sensor heater circuit. The resistance should be between 2 and 10 ohms. If the resistance is out of range, you’ll need to replace the oxygen sensor.
2. Check the wiring harness. Inspect the wiring harness for damage. Look for frayed wires, damaged connectors, or corrosion. If you find any damage, you’ll need to repair or replace the wiring harness.
3. Check the connection between the oxygen sensor and the PCM. Make sure that the connection between the oxygen sensor and the PCM is tight and secure. If the connection is loose, you’ll need to tighten it.

If you’ve checked the oxygen sensor heater circuit, the wiring harness, and the connection between the oxygen sensor and the PCM and you still have the P0139 code, you’ll need to replace the oxygen sensor.

How To Fix P0139 Code?

| Symptom | Cause | Fix |
|—|—|—|
| Check Engine Light is on | O2 Sensor is not working properly | Replace the O2 Sensor |
| Engine misfires | O2 Sensor is sending incorrect data to the Engine Computer | Replace the O2 Sensor |
| Poor fuel economy | O2 Sensor is not working properly | Replace the O2 Sensor |

What is the P0139 Code?

The P0139 code is a generic OBD-II code that indicates that the oxygen sensor heater circuit for the second oxygen sensor (sensor 2) on the downstream side of the catalytic converter is malfunctioning. This code is often accompanied by the P0130, P0131, P0132, P0133, P0134, P0135, P0136, and P0138 codes.

The oxygen sensor heater is used to warm up the oxygen sensor so that it can provide accurate readings more quickly. When the oxygen sensor heater circuit is malfunctioning, the oxygen sensor will not be able to warm up properly and will not be able to provide accurate readings. This can lead to the engine running rich or lean, which can cause a number of problems.

What Causes the P0139 Code?

There are a number of things that can cause the P0139 code, including:

  • A faulty oxygen sensor heater
  • A damaged wiring harness for the oxygen sensor heater
  • A loose connection between the oxygen sensor heater and the wiring harness
  • A problem with the engine control module (ECM)

Symptoms of the P0139 Code

The symptoms of the P0139 code can vary depending on the severity of the problem. Some of the common symptoms include:

  • A check engine light
  • A decrease in fuel economy
  • A rough idle
  • A hesitation when accelerating
  • A loss of power

How to Fix the P0139 Code

The P0139 code can be fixed by:

  • Replacing the oxygen sensor heater
  • Repairing or replacing the wiring harness for the oxygen sensor heater
  • Repairing or replacing the connection between the oxygen sensor heater and the wiring harness
  • Reprogramming the ECM

The P0139 code is a serious problem that can lead to a number of problems. If you have this code, it is important to have it diagnosed and repaired as soon as possible.

How to Diagnose the P0139 Code?

The P0139 code is a generic OBD-II code that indicates that the oxygen sensor heater circuit is malfunctioning. This code can be caused by a number of different problems, so it’s important to have your vehicle diagnosed by a qualified technician to determine the exact cause.

Here are some of the common causes of the P0139 code:

  • A faulty oxygen sensor heater. The oxygen sensor heater is used to warm up the oxygen sensor so that it can provide accurate readings. If the heater is faulty, it can cause the P0139 code to be set.
  • A wiring problem. The oxygen sensor heater circuit is made up of a number of wires. If any of these wires are damaged or corroded, it can cause the P0139 code to be set.
  • A bad ground. The oxygen sensor heater needs a good ground in order to function properly. If the ground connection is faulty, it can cause the P0139 code to be set.

Here are some of the symptoms that you may experience if your vehicle has the P0139 code:

  • Reduced fuel economy. The oxygen sensor heater helps to improve the fuel efficiency of your vehicle. If the heater is faulty, it can cause your vehicle to lose fuel efficiency.
  • Increased emissions. The oxygen sensor heater helps to reduce the emissions of your vehicle. If the heater is faulty, it can cause your vehicle to emit more pollutants.
  • Check engine light. The P0139 code will cause the check engine light to illuminate on your dashboard.

If you notice any of these symptoms, it’s important to have your vehicle diagnosed by a qualified technician to determine the exact cause of the problem.

How to Fix the P0139 Code?

The P0139 code can be fixed by repairing or replacing the faulty oxygen sensor heater. If the problem is caused by a wiring problem or a bad ground, the wires or ground connection can be repaired or replaced.

Here are the steps involved in fixing the P0139 code:

1. Inspect the oxygen sensor heater. The oxygen sensor heater is located near the exhaust manifold. Inspect the heater for any signs of damage, such as cracks or corrosion. If the heater is damaged, it will need to be replaced.
2. Check the wiring. Inspect the wiring for the oxygen sensor heater for any signs of damage, such as broken wires or corroded connectors. If the wiring is damaged, it will need to be repaired or replaced.
3. Check the ground connection. Inspect the ground connection for the oxygen sensor heater for any signs of damage, such as loose or corroded terminals. If the ground connection is faulty, it will need to be repaired or replaced.

Once the faulty oxygen sensor heater or wiring has been repaired or replaced, the P0139 code should be cleared. If the code returns, it’s possible that there is another problem with your vehicle. In this case, it’s best to have your vehicle diagnosed by a qualified technician.

The P0139 code is a common OBD-II code that can be caused by a number of different problems. It’s important to have your vehicle diagnosed by a qualified technician to determine the exact cause of the problem and to fix it properly.

Q: What does the P0139 code mean?
A: The P0139 code is a generic OBD-II code that indicates that the oxygen sensor heater circuit for the downstream oxygen sensor (sensor 2) is malfunctioning.

Q: What are the symptoms of a P0139 code?
A: The symptoms of a P0139 code may include:

  • Reduced fuel economy
  • Increased emissions
  • Engine hesitation or stalling
  • Rough idle
  • Check engine light illuminated

Q: What causes the P0139 code?
A There are a number of potential causes for the P0139 code, including:

  • A faulty oxygen sensor heater
  • A damaged wiring harness or connector
  • A problem with the engine control module (ECM)

Q: How is the P0139 code diagnosed?
A: The P0139 code can be diagnosed using a OBD-II scanner. The scanner will be able to read the code and provide information about the specific sensor that is malfunctioning.

Q: How is the P0139 code fixed?
A: The P0139 code can be fixed by replacing the faulty oxygen sensor heater. In some cases, it may also be necessary to repair the wiring harness or connector, or replace the ECM.

Q: What are the precautions to take when fixing the P0139 code?
A: When fixing the P0139 code, it is important to take the following precautions:

  • Make sure to disconnect the battery before working on the vehicle.
  • Wear gloves to protect your hands from the chemicals in the engine.
  • Use the correct tools for the job.
  • Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for replacing the oxygen sensor heater.

Q: What are the long-term effects of a P0139 code?
A: If the P0139 code is not fixed, it can lead to a number of problems, including:

  • Reduced fuel economy
  • Increased emissions
  • Engine damage
  • Engine failure

Q: How can I prevent the P0139 code from happening again?
A: There are a few things you can do to prevent the P0139 code from happening again, including:

  • Keep your vehicle well-maintained.
  • Inspect the oxygen sensor heater regularly for damage.
  • Repair any wiring harness or connector problems immediately.
  • Replace the ECM if necessary.

    the P0139 code is a common problem that can occur in a variety of vehicles. It is caused by a faulty oxygen sensor, which can be diagnosed and repaired by a qualified mechanic. By following the steps outlined in this article, you can fix the P0139 code and get your vehicle back on the road in no time.

Here are some key takeaways from this article:

  • The P0139 code is a diagnostic trouble code (DTC) that indicates that the oxygen sensor downstream of the catalytic converter is reporting a voltage that is too low.
  • This code can be caused by a faulty oxygen sensor, a wiring problem, or a problem with the catalytic converter itself.
  • The most common way to fix the P0139 code is to replace the oxygen sensor.
  • If replacing the oxygen sensor does not fix the code, you may need to check the wiring or the catalytic converter.
  • By following the steps outlined in this article, you can fix the P0139 code and get your vehicle back on the road in no time.

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